Living Justice Press

 
 
Indigenous Approaches to Justice

Indian Law Resource Center: http://www.indianlaw.org/

Indian Law Resource Center is a non-profit law and advocacy organization established and directed by American Indians. We provide legal assistance to Indian and Alaska Native nations who are working to protect their lands, resources, human rights, environment and cultural heritage. Our principal goal is the preservation and well-being of Indian and other Native nations and tribes.

Indian Law Resource Center is a non-profit law and advocacy organization established and directed by American Indians. We provide legal assistance to Indian and Alaska Native nations who are working to protect their lands, resources, human rights, environment and cultural heritage. Our principal goal is the preservation and well-being of Indian and other Native nations and tribes.

Mettanokit: http://www.circleway.org

"Mettanokit is a non-profit learning center and service organization working for a more human society based on the old values of cooperation and equality and the closeness and caring found in our elder tribal societies. Programs and services respectfully incorporate the ancestral wisdom of Native Americans and others who honor harmonious living with Mother Earth and spiritual connections with Creation.

"Part of our program is offering Native circles in prisons. We currently have 10 of these circles in New England prisons. Description of these may be found in the booklet Ending Violent Crime. Another part is creating circles world-wide for healing, building community, and world change. Description of this work may be found in the booklet The Circle Way. Descriptions of the Native American traditions that provide an understanding for much of this work may be found in the book Return to Creation."

The Aboriginal Justice Learning Network (Canada): http://canada.justice.gc.ca/en/ps/ajln/

The Aboriginal Justice Learning Network (AJLN) is "a broad-based voluntary network of representatives of the conventional justice system and Aboriginal communities. The AJLN is managed through a National Coordinator's Office in the Department of Justice in Ottawa. Together, we work for change in the administration and provision of justice services by and for Aboriginal peoples.

National Tribal Justice Resource Center: www.tribalresourcecenter.org

The National Tribal Justice Resource Center is the largest and most comprehensive site dedicated to tribal justice systems, personnel and tribal law. The Resource Center is the central national clearinghouse of information for Native American and Alaska Native tribal courts, providing both technical assistance and resources for the development and enhancement of tribal justice system personnel. Programs and services developed by the Resource Center are offered to all tribal justice system personnel -- whether working with formalized tribal courts or with tradition-based tribal dispute resolution forums.

Justice as Healing: www.usask.ca/nativelaw/publications/desc/justice.html. Justice as Healing is "a quarterly newsletter which deals with Aboriginal concepts of justice founded upon Aboriginal knowledge and language and rooted in Aboriginal experiences and feelings of wrongs and indignation. The term refers to an old tradition in Aboriginal thought and society. After the Aboriginal experience with colonialism, racism, domination and oppression, there is a return to this tradition of ‘Justice as Healing’ as a foundation for contemporary remedies. While there is no one single theory of Aboriginal justice, the common theme remains the necessity of Aboriginal knowledge healing Aboriginal people." Back issues are available and full of excellent material.

Native Law Centre of Canada: http://www.usask.ca/nativelaw/

The Native Law Centre at the University of Saskatchewan was founded in 1975 by Dr. Roger C. Carter whose commitment to Aboriginal and social justice issues convinced the University of the need for a Centre to facilitate access to legal education for Aboriginal peoples, to promote the development of the law and the legal system in Canada in ways which better accommodate the advancement of Aboriginal peoples and communities, and to disseminate information concerning Aboriginal peoples and the law.

   
 
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